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Archive for May, 2011

“I Don’t Wanna Spoil the Party “

by Cherokee Billie

In the fall of 1965 when I was fourteen years old I was invited to my first teenage boy/girl party in Los Angeles, California. Kenneth, a boy I had known since I was ten years old was giving it. Our parents had been good friends with his parents. Kenneth had always been crazy about me; I assumed I was his date for the party. When he told me to bring along anyone I wanted, I invited my friend Lois to join me.

Nervous about my first big party, I dressed in my finest outfit, black shirt and black pants with ankle length black boots that had a gold chain wrapped around the heel. With my shoulder length brown hair flipped in the current style I felt I looked very grown-up, even though I wasn’t allowed to wear makeup.

My father drove Lois and me to Kenneth’s house. When we got inside, Mr. Finley, Kenneth’s father greeted us from his hospital bed set up in the living room. “Come on in girls. Glad you could make it.” Mr. Finley was in his early 40’s, but was terminal with cancer. He had always been a very slim man, but now he looked emaciated. His dark hair exaggerated the paleness of his skin, and his eyes seemed larger than before.

There were many teenagers, a few years older than I, roaming throughout the house laughing and talking. I didn’t know anyone except Kenneth and his family as all of the teenagers went to the same high school as Kenneth. I was still in junior high school. His two younger brothers, Wayne and Jerry, were busy chasing after the girls at the party.

Lois and I went into the dining room to get some Cokes, potato chips, and dip. Kenneth was leaning his long lanky frame against the doorway arch in the dining room talking with an Asian girl. When he saw me he said, “Hi, help yourselves to whatever you want. I need to mingle with my other friends. I’ll catch up with you later.” Kenneth continued his conversation with the Asian girl, leaving me feeling abandoned.

Lois was very shy and stayed by my side. I sat down next to Mr. Finley’s bed and started talking with him about my love of music. He was very kind and seemed genuinely interested in what I had to say. He lit a cigarette, lay back in bed, and smoked, as I told him about seeing the Beatles, the first time a year before, and the second time a few months earlier at the Hollywood Bowl.

“Man, you wouldn’t believe how the girls never stopped screaming. I saw girls faint when the Beatles appeared on stage. I couldn’t believe all the chaos. I couldn’t hear a single note of music. I really wanted to hear them. It was wonderful to be there, but all I heard was screaming. Our seats were so far in the back up on the hill that even with binoculars the Beatles looked the size of beetle insects.” Mr. Finley couldn’t stop laughing. “It took me three days to be able to hear normally after all of that screaming.” I certainly didn’t want to talk about his health, as I knew it would be very painful emotionally for him, so I kept chatting about the Beatles. I sensed he was lonely lying in that hospital bed in the living room while a party was going on in the dining room and kitchen.

Even though there was rock-and-roll music playing I noticed, after a while, the chatter that had filled the house was gone. As I looked around I saw there was no one left in the house except Mr. Finley, Lois, and me. Curiosity got the best of me, and I excused myself to go to the bathroom. I took a look around the house and saw there was not one single teenager anywhere inside. I slipped out the back door, and I saw all the teenagers in the garage behind the house making out. Kenneth was busy shoving his tongue down the Asian girl’s throat. That was it for me.

I came back into the house and telephoned my father from the kitchen phone and asked him to pick us up. I returned to the living room and told Mr. Finley, “My father’s on his way over so we’ll be leaving now. I think we’ll wait outside. It was nice visiting with you this evening.”

I could see the sadness in Mr. Finley’s big eyes knowing that his son had been such a lout, but there was really no point in staying. I felt totally humiliated being ignored by Kenneth. Here I was at my first teenage party, and I felt like a hindrance to the obvious make out action. I had never kissed a boy and knew nothing about making out.

Once outside Lois and I stood by the curb in the cool evening air, and I kept singing out loud the Beatles song, “I Don’t Wanna Spoil the Party.” “I don’t wanna spoil the party, so I’ll go. I would hate my disappointment to show. There’s nothing for me here so I will disappear.”

After the party Mr. Finley really chewed out Kenneth for being so rude to me, my mother told me a few days later. Mr. Finley died a few months later. When I sat in the church pew at his funeral I kept thinking of his kindness to a young girl who felt alone at her first grown up party. Even when he was close to death he showed great compassion. This is a great lesson of how to live even under the direst circumstances.

Forty six years later when I hear that Beatles song I remember that party and the gentle spirit of Mr. Finley. I am sure his spirit stays with me just like the memory of him is always with me.

Some Wisdom of the West from Will Rogers


Will Rogers, who died in a 1935 plane crash, was one of the
greatest political sages this country has ever known.

Enjoy the following:
1. Never slap a man who’s chewing tobacco.

2. Never kick a cow chip on a hot day.

3. There are two theories to arguing with a woman.
Neither works.

4. Never miss a good chance to shut up.

5. Always drink upstream from the herd.

6. If you find yourself in a hole, stop digging.

7. The quickest way to double your money is to fold it
and put it back into your pocket.

8. There are three kinds of men:
The ones that learn by reading.
The few who learn by observation.
The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence
and find out for themselves.

9. Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

10. If you’re riding’ ahead of the herd, take a look back every now and then
to make sure it’s still there.

11. Lettin’ the cat outta the bag is a whole lot easier’n puttin’ it back.

12. After eating an entire bull, a mountain lion felt so good he started roaring.
He kept it up until a hunter came along and shot him.
The moral: When you’re full of bull, keep your mouth shut.

13. “Never squat while wearing your spurs”

ABOUT GROWING OLDER…

First ~Eventually you will reach a point when you stop lying
about your age and start bragging about it.

Second ~ The older we get, the fewer things seem worth waiting in line for.

Third ~ Some people try to turn back their odometers.
Not me; I want people to know ‘why’ I look this way.
I’ve traveled a long way, and some of the roads weren’t paved.

Fourth ~ When you are dissatisfied and would like to go back to youth,
think of Algebra.

Fifth ~ You know you are getting old when everything either dries up or leaks.

Sixth ~ I don’t know how I got over the hill without getting to the top.

Seventh ~ One of the many things no one tells you about aging
is that it’s such a nice change from being young.

Eighth ~ One must wait until evening to see how splendid the day has been.

Ninth ~ Being young is beautiful, but being old is comfortable.

Tenth ~ Long ago, when men cursed and beat the ground with sticks,
it was called witchcraft.
Today it’s called golf.

And, finally ~ If you don’t learn to laugh at trouble,
you won’t have anything to laugh at when you’re old.

Memorial Day Weekend Special!


Are you looking for a peaceful way to spend a Sunday evening this Memorial Day weekend? I invite you to join me Sunday evening, May 29, at 8:00 PM EST when I am the guest on Be Love Now, a radio show hosted by Marc on Blog Talk Radio. It will be an evening of spirituality, music, meditation, sheer enjoyment, and enlightenment. There will be psychic readings, but mostly we will be talking about a variety of spiritual topics.

It is a 2 hour show and promises to be one that you will not want to miss. Click Here To Go Directly To The Program. Call in number: (646) 929-0419

So put on a pot of tea or whatever you like to relax with, get comfortable, and join us on Sunday evening, May 29, from 8:00 PM. until 10 PM EST for a peaceful and wonderful break from a busy weekend.

Remember this program will be available to listen to any time after we record it on Sunday.

Many Blessings,
Cherokee Billie

On My 60Th Birthday I Give Women Words Of Wisdom To Live By


1. Aspire to be Barbie – the bitch has everything.

2. If the shoe fits – buy them in every color.

3. Take life with a pinch of salt… A wedge of lime, and a shot of tequila.

4. In need of a support group? – Cocktail hour with the girls!

5. Go on the 30 day diet. (I’m on it and so far I’ve lost 15 days).

6. When life gets you down – just put on your big girl panties and deal with it.

7. Let your greatest fear be that there is no PMS and this is just your personality.

8. I know I’m in my own little world, but it’s ok. They know me here.

9 Lead me not into temptation, I can find it myself.

10. Don’t get your knickers in a knot; it solves nothing and makes you walk funny.

11. When life gives you lemons – buy some Coronas.

12. Forget about the perfect man – he’s living in San Fran with his boyfriend.

13. Keep your chin up, only the first 40 years of parenthood are the hardest.

14. If it has tires or testicles it’s gonna give you trouble.

15. By the time a women realizes her mother was right, she has a daughter who thinks she’s wrong.

‘Good friends are like stars… You don’t always see them, but you know they are always there’

Have A Garbage-Free Day!

One day I hopped in a taxi and we took off for the airport. We were driving in the right lane when suddenly a black car jumped out of a parking space right in front of us.

My taxi driver slammed on his brakes, skidded, and missed the other car by just inches!
The driver of the other car whipped his head around and started yelling at us.

My taxi driver just smiled and waved at the guy. And I mean he was really friendly.
So I asked, ‘Why did you just do that? This guy almost ruined your car and sent us to the hospital!’

This is when my taxi driver taught me what I now call, ‘The Law of the Garbage Truck.’

He explained that many people are like garbage trucks. They run around full of garbage,
full of frustration, full of anger, and full of disappointment. As their garbage piles up, they need a place to dump it and sometimes they’ll dump it on you. Don’t take it personally.

Just smile, wave, wish them well, and move on. Don’t take their garbage and spread it to other people at work, at home, or on the streets.

The bottom line is that successful people do not let garbage trucks take over their day.
Life’s too short to wake up in the morning with regrets, so….

Love the people who treat you right.

Pray for the ones who don’t.

Life is ten percent what you make it and ninety percent how you take it!

Have A Garbage-Free Day!

Bob Dylan turns 70 today!

From the moment I heard Bob Dylan I realized he knew a lot more about life and the world than I did. He has played a big part in my life and I think he is one of the greatest songwriters ever to live. I’m posting one of his most powerful songs for you. Happy birthday Bob!

Who Packed Your Parachute


Charles Plumb was a US Navy jet pilot in Vietnam. After 75 combat missions, his plane was destroyed by a surface-to-air missile.

Plumb ejected and parachuted into enemy hands. He was captured and spent 6 years in a communist Vietnamese prison. He survived the ordeal and now lectures on lessons learned from that experience!

One day, when Plumb and his wife were sitting in a restaurant, a man at another table came up and said, “You’re Plumb! You flew jet fighters in Vietnam from the aircraft carrier Kitty Hawk. You were shot down!”

“How in the world did you know that?” asked Plumb.

“I packed your parachute,” the man replied. Plumb gasped in surprise and gratitude. The man pumped his hand and said, “I guess it worked!” Plumb assured him, “It sure did. If your chute hadn’t worked, I wouldn’t be here today.”
Plumb couldn’t sleep that night, thinking about that man. Plumb says, “I kept wondering what he had looked like in a Navy uniform: a white hat; a bib in the back; and bell-bottom trousers. I wonder how many times I might have seen him and not even said ‘Good morning, how are you?’ or anything because, you see, I was a fighter pilot and he was just a sailor.” Plumb thought of the many hours the sailor had spent at a long wooden table in the bowels of the ship, carefully weaving the shrouds and folding the silks of each chute, holding in his hands each time the fate of someone he didn’t know.

Now, Plumb asks his audience, “Who’s packing your parachute?” Everyone has someone who provides what they need to make it through the day. He also points out that he needed many kinds of parachutes when his plane was shot down over enemy territory – he needed his physical parachute, his mental parachute, his emotional parachute, and his spiritual parachute. He called on all these supports before reaching safety.

Sometimes in the daily challenges that life gives us, we miss what is really important. We may fail to say hello, please, or thank you, congratulate someone on something wonderful that has happened to them, give a compliment, or just do something nice for no reason. As you go through this week, this month, this year, recognize people who pack your parachutes.

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