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Full Harvest Moon September 19, 2013

Harvest moon
The Harvest Moon is coming this Thursday! The moon has been waxing larger each night, and full moon is the night of September 19, 2013. In traditional skylore, the Harvest Moon is the full moon closest to the autumnal equinox. This is known as the Nut Moon. The Ripe Corn Festival is held in the early part of this moon to acknowledge the Corn Mother and the Earth Mother. The Brush Feast festival is also held. Fruits and nuts are still being gathered, much of which goes into breads. Hunting in earnest begins.
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The moon officially turns full when it reaches the spot in the sky opposite (180 degrees) from the sun. That moment will occur on Thursday (Sept. 19) at 7:13 a.m. EDT (1113 GMT). Thursday’s full moon is the one nearest to the September equinox this year, making it the Harvest Moon by the usual definition.

This full moon’s name is attributed to Native Americans because it marked when corn was supposed to be harvested. Most often, the September full moon is actually the Harvest Moon, which is the full Moon that occurs closest to the autumn equinox. In two years out of three, the Harvest Moon comes in September, but in some years it occurs in October. At the peak of harvest, farmers can work late into the night by the light of this Moon. Usually the full Moon rises an average of 50 minutes later each night, but for the few nights around the Harvest Moon, the Moon seems to rise at nearly the same time each night: just 25 to 30 minutes later across the U.S., and only 10 to 20 minutes later for much of Canada and Europe. Corn, pumpkins, squash, beans, and wild rice the chief Indian staples are now ready for gathering

The moon will appear round and full on all the nights around this full moon. So why is this moon – the moon closest to the autumnal equinox – called the Harvest Moon? The shorter-than-usual time between moonrises around the full Harvest Moon means no long period of darkness between sunset and moonrise for days in succession. In the days before tractor lights, the lamp of the Harvest Moon helped farmers to gather their crops, despite the diminishing daylight hours. As the sun’s light faded in the west, the moon would soon rise in the east to illuminate the fields throughout the night.

Who named the Harvest Moon? Full Moon names date back to Native Americans, of what is now the northern and eastern United States. The tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the Moon names, but in general, the same ones were current throughout the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior. European settlers followed that custom and created some of their own names. Since the lunar month is only 29 days long on the average, the full Moon dates shift from year to year That name probably sprang to the lips of farmers throughout the Northern Hemisphere, on autumn evenings, as the Harvest Moon aided in bringing in the crops.

The name was popularized in the early 20th century by the song below.

Shine On Harvest Moon
By Nora Bayes and Jack Norworth (1903)
“Shine on, shine on harvest moon
Up in the sky,
I ain’t had no lovin’
Since January, February, June or July
Snow time ain’t no time to stay
Outdoors and spoon,
So shine on, shine on harvest moon,
For me and my gal.”

It is time for us to spiritually shed the dead parts from our souls and make way for the new growth that is being released at this sacred time. This is your opportunity to advance your soul growth. Do not let this moment pass you by.

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