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Posts tagged ‘harvest moon’

Harvest Full Moon September 16, 2016

harvest-moon-copia

Time to Reap What You Have Sown This Year!

Summer’s end is on the horizon, and the arrival of autumn will be heralded by a Harvest Moon on Sept. 16 in Pisces.  In traditional Skylore, the Harvest Moon is the full moon closest to the autumnal equinox, which will take place on Sept. 22. This is known as the Nut Moon. The Ripe Corn Festival is held in the early part of this moon to acknowledge the Corn Mother and the Earth Mother. The Brush Feast festival is also held. Fruits and nuts are still being gathered, much of which goes into breads. Hunting in earnest begins.

This is a powerful equalizing or neutralizing time, and as such is a good time to finally release things which have been a burden or stress in your life. This causes a temporary rebalancing for you at least for a couple weeks which can be a powerful time to start new projects or to finalize old ones you have been unable to bring a close to. The time is now!

This is the harvest time, where all the hard work and effort we have put into things in the past, so tirelessly, is about to be rewarded. We will start to reap what we have sewn.

Things have not always been easy and you may be feeling tired like you have been working so hard for little reward, but do not give up even though you are tired. Do not quit so close to the finish line as you are nearly there and with the energy that is coming through you will be able to reach your goals.

Things To Do During A Full Moon!

Start With:

What is a Harvest Moon?

Who named the Harvest Moon? Full Moon names date back to Native Americans, of what is now the northern and eastern United States. The tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred.

At the peak of harvest, farmers can work late into the night by the light of this Moon. Usually the full Moon rises an average of 50 minutes later each night, but for the few nights around the Harvest Moon, the Moon seems to rise at nearly the same time each night: just 25 to 30 minutes later across the U.S., and only 10 to 20 minutes later for much of Canada and Europe. Corn, pumpkins, squash, beans, and wild rice the chief Indian staples are now ready for gathering

So why is this moon – the moon closest to the autumnal equinox – called the Harvest Moon? The shorter-than-usual time between moonrises around the full Harvest Moon means no long period of darkness between sunset and moonrise for days in succession.

In the days before tractor lights, the lamp of the Harvest Moon helped farmers to gather their crops, despite the diminishing daylight hours. As the sun’s light faded in the west, the moon would soon rise in the east to illuminate the fields throughout the night. That name probably sprang to the lips of farmers throughout the Northern Hemisphere, on autumn evenings, as the Harvest Moon aided in bringing in the crops.

Time To Let Go

It is time for us to spiritually shed the dead parts from our souls, just like the trees are letting go of the leaves, and make way for the new growth that is being released at this sacred time. This is your opportunity to advance your soul growth. Do not let this moment pass you by.

While September proves to be a generous month, we must be ever conscious of the path ahead, the needs that may arise and that life is always a maze of shifts, twists and turns.

Uncover and understand what came before and what lies ahead in the spiritual harvest of September’s gratitude and grace.

Take advantage of a Full Moon Reading which will give you guidance on your path. This is a special time of year to direct how your year ends.

Full Moon Blessings,
Cherokee Billie

Please take a few minutes and visit my new web site at: CherokeeBillieSpiritualAdvisor.com

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Hunters Full Moon and Eclipse October 08, 2014

Hunters Full Moon and Eclipse October 08, 2014

If you’re prone to tilt your head and howl at the moon, like the great hunters the coyotes, October 8 will be the only night this month when the moon will be visible in the sky all night long. Just be mindful of the neighbors when you howl!

All you Moon Lovers Mark your calendars! The night sky of October 2014 is going to provide a delightful view for sky gazers. The tenth month of the year is going to present celestial wonders. In the new month, sky watchers can enjoy array of astronomical events including two eclipses, two meteor showers, Uranus at opposition and more. Total Lunar Eclipse: On Oct. 8, 2014, sky watchers can witness total lunar eclipse which will soon be followed by partial solar eclipse on Oct. 23. The second of total lunar eclipse tetrad will occur before the dawn.

Draconids Meteor Shower: This astronomical event occurs on Oct. 8 and 9. Sea Sky reports it is a “minor” one that merely produces 10 meteors per hour. However, the brightness of the full moon may become a hindrance for the sky watchers wanting to enjoy the meteor shower. For the best view, one should retreat to a place away from “city lights” at the middle of the night.

In skylore, the Northern Hemisphere’s Hunter’s Moon on October 7-8 will be called a Blood Moon. Plus the October 7-8 total lunar eclipse – the second of four total lunar eclipses in the ongoing lunar tetrad – has been widely called a Blood Moon. Voila. Double Blood Moon.

To the Native Americans full moons were a way to keep track of the seasons and make appropriate preparations for survival. Besides, with falling leaves and the fattening of wild game, also preparing for winter, who could argue that this month’s moon signaled a good time to go hunting. Hunter’s Moon the name for the full moon after the Harvest Moon, which is the full moon nearest the September 23 autumnal equinox. This year, the Harvest Moon came on September 9. That’s why October’s moon bears the name Hunter’s Moon.

The Hunters Full Moon is also called the Shedding Moon, Blood Moon, or the Falling Leaf Moon. Coming right before Samhain/Halloween, it is a time when the nights are crisp and clear, and you can sense a change in the energy around you.

  • The Gemstones are obsidian, amethyst and tourmaline.
  • This is the time to give thanks to the animals, fruits, and vegetables during this moon for giving their lives so we can live.
  • Use red candles and burn cinnamon, nutmeg or ginger as your incense.

This is the time when the veil between our world and the spirit world are at its thinnest. Use this time for spiritual growth. If there is a deceased ancestor you wish to contact, this is a great month to do it. Throughout October work on your spiritual self, and pay attention to messages you get in your dreams. Plan a ritual to remember those who have passed from this world, and be sure to make an offering to them.

As for Halloween night, the moon, if visible at all will be just a thin sliver, adding to the mystery of the night.

People have asked the question how often they should have a reading done by a psychic. An in depth reading should be done every moon cycle. Since, every moon cycle represents a change it not only affects our external forces but our internal forces as well. Call today to find out what is in store for you during this time of change, (866)-563-3997.

The full moon is always a good time to pray, have ceremonies, and be reminded of the continuation of life. Enjoy my friends.

Full Moon Blessings,
Cherokee Billie
CherokeeBillie.com

 

Hunters’ Full Moon October 18, 2013

OCT 18 Full Moon
The Hunter’s Moon is the full moon after the Harvest Moon. The full moon on October 18-19 is the Northern Hemisphere’s Hunter’s Moon. If you’re prone to tilt your head and howl at the moon, like the great hunters the coyotes, October 18 will be the only night this month when the moon will be visible in the sky all night long. Just be mindful of the neighbors when you howl!

As for Halloween night, the moon, if visible at all will be just a thin sliver, adding to the mystery of the night.

To the Native Americans full moons were a way to keep track of the seasons and make appropriate preparations for survival. Besides, with falling leaves and the fattening of wild game, also preparing for winter, who could argue that this month’s moon signaled a good time to go hunting.

As the moon rises in the east at dusk (Friday, October 18) in the continental United States, the lunar disk will be partially covered over by the Earth’s faint penumbral shadow. But you’re very unlikely to notice any shading at all on the moon’s surface. Europe and Africa will be in a better position to see the subtle penumbral eclipse because the lunar eclipse takes place at late night (instead of evening or morning twilight). For the most of Asia, the moon will be in eclipse as its sets at sunrise tomorrow (Saturday, October 19). Be forewarned. The moon does not dip into the Earth’s dark umbral shadow during this eclipse, so – at best – the partial penumbral eclipse may be seen as a slight shading of the moon’s southern limb.

Some say it is unlucky to sleep in the light of the moonlight, but I disagree. I relish it. I imagine that I am drawing down her beauty and energy to store it and draw upon as needed.

The full moon is always a good time to pray, have ceremonies, and be reminded of the continuation of life. Enjoy my friends.

Many blessings,
Cherokee Billie

Full Harvest Moon September 19, 2013

Harvest moon
The Harvest Moon is coming this Thursday! The moon has been waxing larger each night, and full moon is the night of September 19, 2013. In traditional skylore, the Harvest Moon is the full moon closest to the autumnal equinox. This is known as the Nut Moon. The Ripe Corn Festival is held in the early part of this moon to acknowledge the Corn Mother and the Earth Mother. The Brush Feast festival is also held. Fruits and nuts are still being gathered, much of which goes into breads. Hunting in earnest begins.
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The moon officially turns full when it reaches the spot in the sky opposite (180 degrees) from the sun. That moment will occur on Thursday (Sept. 19) at 7:13 a.m. EDT (1113 GMT). Thursday’s full moon is the one nearest to the September equinox this year, making it the Harvest Moon by the usual definition.

This full moon’s name is attributed to Native Americans because it marked when corn was supposed to be harvested. Most often, the September full moon is actually the Harvest Moon, which is the full Moon that occurs closest to the autumn equinox. In two years out of three, the Harvest Moon comes in September, but in some years it occurs in October. At the peak of harvest, farmers can work late into the night by the light of this Moon. Usually the full Moon rises an average of 50 minutes later each night, but for the few nights around the Harvest Moon, the Moon seems to rise at nearly the same time each night: just 25 to 30 minutes later across the U.S., and only 10 to 20 minutes later for much of Canada and Europe. Corn, pumpkins, squash, beans, and wild rice the chief Indian staples are now ready for gathering

The moon will appear round and full on all the nights around this full moon. So why is this moon – the moon closest to the autumnal equinox – called the Harvest Moon? The shorter-than-usual time between moonrises around the full Harvest Moon means no long period of darkness between sunset and moonrise for days in succession. In the days before tractor lights, the lamp of the Harvest Moon helped farmers to gather their crops, despite the diminishing daylight hours. As the sun’s light faded in the west, the moon would soon rise in the east to illuminate the fields throughout the night.

Who named the Harvest Moon? Full Moon names date back to Native Americans, of what is now the northern and eastern United States. The tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full Moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the Moon names, but in general, the same ones were current throughout the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior. European settlers followed that custom and created some of their own names. Since the lunar month is only 29 days long on the average, the full Moon dates shift from year to year That name probably sprang to the lips of farmers throughout the Northern Hemisphere, on autumn evenings, as the Harvest Moon aided in bringing in the crops.

The name was popularized in the early 20th century by the song below.

Shine On Harvest Moon
By Nora Bayes and Jack Norworth (1903)
“Shine on, shine on harvest moon
Up in the sky,
I ain’t had no lovin’
Since January, February, June or July
Snow time ain’t no time to stay
Outdoors and spoon,
So shine on, shine on harvest moon,
For me and my gal.”

It is time for us to spiritually shed the dead parts from our souls and make way for the new growth that is being released at this sacred time. This is your opportunity to advance your soul growth. Do not let this moment pass you by.

Nut Full Moon Date: Monday, September 12, 2011


Names Given to the Moon by Other Cultures:
Colonial American: Harvest Moon
Chinese: Chrysanthemum Moon
Native American(Cherokee): Nut Moon

This full Moon is the Cherokee “Nut Moon” or the Celtic “Singing Moon.” Watch it rise as the Sun sets.

The corn harvest referred to as “Ripe Corn Festival” also known as the “Nut Moon” [spoken “Nv-da u-da-ta-nv” in Cherokee], was customarily held in the early part of this moon to acknowledge Selu the spirit of the corn. Selu is thought of as First Woman. The festival respects Mother Earth as well for providing all foods during the growing season. The “Brush Feast Festival” also customarily takes place in this season. All the fruits and nuts of the bushes and trees of the forest were gathered as this time. A wide variety of nuts from the trees went into the nut breads for the various festivals throughout the seasons. Hunting traditionally began in earnest at this time.

Nut was the goddess of the sky and all heavenly bodies, a symbol of protecting the dead when they enter the after life. According to the Egyptians, the heavenly bodies—such as the sun and moon—would make their way across her body. Then, at dusk or dawn, they would be swallowed, pass through her belly during the night or day, and be reborn.

The moon continues to fascinate us with all of its mysteries.

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