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Native Indian Rite of Passage

Native Indian Rite of Passage

Do you know the legend of the Cherokee Indian youth’s rite of Passage? His father takes him into the forest, blindfolds him and leaves him alone. He is required to sit on a stump the whole night and not remove the blindfold until the rays of the morning sun shine through it. He cannot cry out for help to anyone Once he survives the night, he is a MAN.

He cannot tell the other boys of this experience, because each lad must come into manhood on his own. The boy is naturally terrified. He can hear all kinds of noises. Wild beasts must surely be all around him. Maybe even some human might do him harms. The wind blew the grass and earth, and shook his stump, but he sat stoically, never removing the blindfold. It would be the only way he could become a man!

Finally, after a horrific night the sun appeared and he removed his blindfold. It was then that he discovered his father sitting on the stump next to him. He had been at watch the entire night, protecting his son from harm. We, too, are never alone. Even when we don’t know it, God is watching over us, sitting on the stump beside us. When trouble comes, all we have to do is reach out to Him. If you liked this story, pass it on. If not, you took off your blindfold before dawn.

Rito de pasaje de un Indio Nativo

¿Conoces la leyenda del rito del pasaje de la Juventud a la adultes de un indio Cherokee? Su padre lo lleva al bosque, con los ojos Vendados y le deja en paz. Está Obligado un Sentarse en un tronco toda la noche y no quitar la venda de los ojos hasta que los rayos del sol de la mañana brillen a traves de ella. El No Puede pedir ayuda a nadie Una vez que sobrevive a la noche, el se convierte en un hombre.

No puede contar a los otros chicos sobre esta experiencia, ya que cada joven debe entrar en la masculinidad por su cuenta. El niño es naturalmente aterrorizado. El Puede oír toda clase de ruidos. Las Fieras, sin duda, PASEAN a su alrededor. Quizas algun humano le puede hacer daño. El viento sopla la hierba y la tierra, y sacude la cepa, pero se sienta estoicamente, nunca quita la venda de los ojos. Sera la unica manera en qué podra convertirse en un hombre!

Por ultimo, despues de una noche horrible y aparece el sol, se quita la venda de los ojos. Es entonces cuando descubre un su padre sentado en un tronco junto a el. Ha estado ahi toda la noche, protegiendo a su hijo de cualquier daño. Nosotros tambien, nunca estamos solos. Aun cuando no lo sabemos, Dios esta velando por nosotros, sentado en el tronco A NUESTRO lado. Cuando los problemas vienen, todo lo que tenemos que hacer es llegar a El. Si te ha gustado esta historia puedes transmitirla. Si no, quitese la venda antes del amanecer.

Native American Awareness Week April 10-15, 2012

Please Share to promote Native Culture around the world!

The Daughter of an Indian

We must live in today’s society
And must live just like they do
But we thrive on our Native Ancestry
Wish we could live like them too

We live like Modern Americans
But way down deep inside
We’re full-blooded Native Americans
Which we’re supposed to hide

But I can’t, can’t you see, for I am what I am

And what I am is Native American
I’m so proud, can’t you see, to be what I am –
The daughter of an Indian

They adopted me and tried to change
The reality of what I am

They tried but can’t rearrange
The fact that I am an Indian

In this land I can be what I want
So long as it isn’t Indian

So when I can I try to flaunt
The fact that I am an Indian
For I must, can’t you see, for I am what I am

And what I am is Native American
I’m so proud, can’t you see, to be what I am –
The daughter of an Indian

I was raised as a white American
So I’d forget just what I am

But I was born Native American
And I’m proud of what I am

I was told not to say that I’m Indian
Or some day I’d live to regret it
But I am a Native American
And my soul won’t let me forget it
For I can’t, can’t you see, I am what I am

And what I am is Native American

I’m proud, can’t you see, to be what I am –
The daughter of an Indian

My People call me a Wanna Be
‘Cause I’m not from a reservation

But weren’t Our People once just like me –
Indian without reservation?

I was born a Native American
And I’ll be one ’til the day I die

I can’t let them say I’m not Indian
And I’ll say, when I look ’em in the eye
Why won’t you let me be to be what I am?
And what I am is Native American

I’m so proud I can be so proud that I am –
The daughter of an Indian

I’m a half-breed American…
but a full-blooded Native American

And I’m proud to be an Indian!

Native American Prophecy (Elders Speak part 3)

Elders Meditation Native American

“But in the Indian Spirit the land is still vested; it will be until other men are able to divine and meet its rhythm. Men must be born and reborn to belong. Their bodies must be formed of the dust of their forefathers’ bones.”
–Luther Standing Bear, OGLALA SIOUX

It is said when we walk on the Earth, we are walking on our ancestors and our unborn children. This is the relationship Native People have with the Earth. It is this relationship which gives insight into the Earth’s rhythm and heartbeat and creates the feeling of belonging. If you feel you belong to something, you’ll treat it with respect. If you feel you are above something, you’ll treat it with disrespect. Indian Spirituality is tied to the Earth. We belong to the Earth along with all other creatures on the Earth. We must align to this realization.

Honoring the Animal Spirits


In the Native American tradition, man communicated with the Creator through interaction with nature; the birds, the forest, the animals…. Many chose or were given symbolic “power animals” whose strength or character reflected the human character traits of the individuals claiming the “power” of that specific animal. Much of this attitude has carried over into modern society as advertisements picture tigers with gas tanks (speed and power) or the U.S Government and the bald eagle (power from a lofty position).

“What does the symbol of a bear, a whale, a wolf, ….. mean?” Each picture or listing provides a starting place in understanding the possible symbolism of each of nature’s creations. Tribal legends or stories have been added to many of the animals

It is my intent to spur your interest into further examination of possible symbolism of each listing and how it may relate to you personally. By no means do I intend that this list represents a totality of information as individual tribes have adopted specific symbolic meanings based on their own cultural folklore.

Click on this link to read more about animals and their meaning based on Native American teachings: Animal Totems and their Meanings

I felt that this would be a good addition for those who have not found their animal totem. An Animal Totem is an important symbolic object used by a person to get in touch with specific qualities found within an animal which the person needs, connects with, or feels a deep affinity toward. In the Native American culture this is the reason people wear fur, feathers or heads of animals on their body, because they were taking on the energy of the animal.

Native Indian Rite of Passage

CherokeeOnHorse
Do you know the legend of the Cherokee Indian youth’s rite of Passage? His father takes him into the forest, blindfolds him and leaves him alone. He is required to sit on a stump the whole night and not remove the blindfold until the rays of the morning sun shine through it. He cannot cry out for help to anyone Once he survives the night, he is a MAN.

He cannot tell the other boys of this experience, because each lad must come into manhood on his own. The boy is naturally terrified. He can hear all kinds of noises. Wild beasts must surely be all around him. Maybe even some human might do him harms. The wind blew the grass and earth, and shook his stump, but he sat stoically, never removing the blindfold. It would be the only way he could become a man!

Finally, after a horrific night the sun appeared and he removed his blindfold. It was then that he discovered his father sitting on the stump next to him. He had been at watch the entire night, protecting his son from harm. We, too, are never alone. Even when we don’t know it, God is watching over us, sitting on the stump beside us. When trouble comes, all we have to do is reach out to Him. If you liked this story, pass it on. If not, you took off your blindfold before dawn.

Rito de pasaje de un Indio Nativo

¿Conoces la leyenda del rito del pasaje de la Juventud a la adultes de un indio Cherokee? Su padre lo lleva al bosque, con los ojos Vendados y le deja en paz. Está Obligado un Sentarse en un tronco toda la noche y no quitar la venda de los ojos hasta que los rayos del sol de la mañana brillen a traves de ella. El No Puede pedir ayuda a nadie Una vez que sobrevive a la noche, el se convierte en un hombre.

No puede contar a los otros chicos sobre esta experiencia, ya que cada joven debe entrar en la masculinidad por su cuenta. El niño es naturalmente aterrorizado. El Puede oír toda clase de ruidos. Las Fieras, sin duda, PASEAN a su alrededor. Quizas algun humano le puede hacer daño. El viento sopla la hierba y la tierra, y sacude la cepa, pero se sienta estoicamente, nunca quita la venda de los ojos. Sera la unica manera en qué podra convertirse en un hombre!

Por ultimo, despues de una noche horrible y aparece el sol, se quita la venda de los ojos. Es entonces cuando descubre un su padre sentado en un tronco junto a el. Ha estado ahi toda la noche, protegiendo a su hijo de cualquier daño. Nosotros tambien, nunca estamos solos. Aun cuando no lo sabemos, Dios esta velando por nosotros, sentado en el tronco A NUESTRO lado. Cuando los problemas vienen, todo lo que tenemos que hacer es llegar a El. Si te ha gustado esta historia puedes transmitirla. Si no, quitese la venda antes del amanecer.

Translation courtesy of Graciela

An Indian Prayer

Cherokee On Horse

Cherokee On Horse

I give you this one thought to keep,
I’m with you still. I do no sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow.
I am the diamond glints on snow.
I am the sunlight on ripened grain.
I am the gentle autumn rain.
When you awaken in the morning hush,
I am the swift uplifting rush,
Of quiet birds in circled flight
I am the soft stars that shine at night.
Do not think of me as gone
I am with you still, in each new dawn.
Do not stand at my grave and weep
I am not there, I do not sleep.
Do not stand there at my grave an cry
I am not there, I did not die.

Author Unknown.

Come Join Me On Native American Traditions

We seek to live our lives in harmony with all, knowing that we share the world with beings and powers both visible and invisible. We strive to walk the good red road. It is the link that connects us with the spirit in all things. We celebrate the changing of the seasons and the great circle of life. We honor the Earth Mother, our connection to the sacred feminine. We honor the Sky Father for balance in the dance of life. We honor the GrandMother’s and GrandFather’s of the four directions and all the ancestors inbetween. We engage in ceremony, prayer, dancing, and singing to help us to join with the Great Spirit. We wish all peoples peace, love, light, joy, and laughter. We are Free Cherokee, independant and proud.
http://www.thespiritguidesnetwork.co.uk/group/nativeamericantraditions

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