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Super Moon- Full Buck Moon on July 22, 2013

Super Moon- Full Buck Moon on July 22, 2013

Super Moon- Full Buck Moon on July 22, 2013


The next supermoon will happen on July 22. A supermoon is a new or full moon that occurs with the moon at or near (within 90% of) its closest approach to Earth in a given orbit. That’s a generous definition, which is why there are so many supermoons! The July 2013 full supermoon is the third one this year.

As always, this July, although the full moon comes at the same instant for everyone worldwide, the clock reads differently according to time zone. In the United States, the July full moon will occur on July 22 at 2:16 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time, 1:16 p.m. Central Daylight Time, 12:16 p.m. Mountain Daylight Time and 11:16 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time.

Full moon names date back to Native Americans, of what is now the northern and eastern United States. The tribes kept track of the seasons by giving distinctive names to each recurring full moon. Their names were applied to the entire month in which each occurred. There was some variation in the moon names, but in general, the same ones were current throughout the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior.

European settlers followed that custom and created some of their own names. Since the lunar month is only 29 days long on the average, the full Moon dates shift from year to year.

Since July is normally the month when the new antlers of buck deer push out of their foreheads in coatings of velvety fur, the full moon of this moon is called the full Buck Moon.

Sometimes this moon was also often called the Full Thunder Moon, because thunderstorms are most frequent during this time. Another name for this month’s Moon was the Full Hay Moon.

This Full Moon is about balancing our commitment to our career and families. Something has been building inside of us, and now is the time when the energy of the cosmos fairly demands that we let out. Over the next two weeks, we will discover what this means for us. For now, we can’t sit on our feelings. We need to express them.

The Full Moon illuminates this conflict between roots and direction. With the Moon full symbolic “illumination” occurs in our own lives. However, these new feelings and revelations are emotional ones, as there is a sense of emotions bursting forth into our consciousness. It’s time to express ourselves, and to let things out of our systems.

Take time to pray and visualize what you want during this full moon.

This is a good time to cleanse and charge your crystals under the Sun during the day and the Moon by night:

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Supermoon-Flower Moon May 05, 2012


The biggest and brightest full moon of the year arrives Saturday night as our celestial neighbor passes closer to Earth than usual.

As soon as the sun sets on May 5, check out the full moon rising in the east. It’s traditionally known as the flower or milk moon by Native American cultures. This month, however, it has also taken on the popular name of “supermoon” because it may appear more impressive than usual.

The moon will be at its closest approach to Earth in its orbit for the month – known as perigee by astronomers – and, in fact, closest it will get to our planet at 356,955 kilometres, until 2014!

This closeness will also make the moon appear a bit bigger in the sky than usual, hence the name “supermoon.” While the visual effect may not be all that “super” to the unaided eye, it will offer some great photo opportunities for West Islanders with telephoto lenses, as it rises above the St. Lawrence River at sunset.

Let’s just hope for clear skies.

In terms of planet watching, two neighboring planets – Mars and Saturn – dominate high in the southern sky long after dusk all month long.

Look just to the lower right of orange hued Mars and find the 78-light-yeardistant brilliant white star named Regulus, the brightest member of the constellation Leo.

Saturn is to the far lower left of Mars in the southern sky after sunset. The ringed planet appears as a brilliant yellow colored star. Amazing to think that we see this 1.5-billion-kilometre-distant gas giant, like we do all the other planets on display, due to sunlight reflecting of its surface.

Just like the Red Planet, Saturn is also paired with a bright star; its companion, shining just below is 263-light-year-distant Spica, in the constellation Virgo.
As an added cosmic treat, watch for the first quarter moon to first pair up with Mars on May 28. Then with Saturn on May 31.

Meantime, Venus is still the brightest in the western evening skies.

As the month progresses, observers will notice that it is making a steady plunge toward the glow of the sunset each progressive night. But by training a steadily held pair of binoculars or a small telescope at the planet, its crescent shape is easily revealed under high magnification.

By the end of the month, the goddess of love will be lost in the sun’s afterglow as it heads for a transit across the sun’s disk on June 5.

Considered one of the rarest of astronomical events, Venus will appear to move across the face of the sun from 6 p.m. till sundown, a sight that won’t be seen again until the year 2117. Don’t miss this wonderful evening!

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