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Bill and Billie

  Bill and Billie

December 27 always is a difficult day for me because my father was the most special person in my life. From the time I was a little girl he was my hero and till the end of his life he was the only person who truly loved me as I was. He always had faith in me, even when I did not.

I have never known a more remarkable person then my Daddy!

Here’s a brief history about my father.  He was born in 1918 and lived in Tennessee.  When he was a little boy of six years old, in the year 1924, his mother, told him to take his two little brothers and sister and find a way to survive.  There were no social services at that time.  My father did get out and took care of those little kids; they slept in barns until he became old enough to provide a rented home.  He never went to school because he worked any type of job on farms he could and was grateful for the work.  Eventually he was able to buy land and had his own farm.

World War Two came along and he was drafted into the army.  He was shipped to the Philippines and fought in the Pacific.  On one mission his entire platoon was killed and he was shot repeatedly, but played dead and was the only survivor of his platoon.

After the army he returned to farming, but the government had shown him there was better ways to make money and offered him an education.

He married my mother in 1950 and they left Tennessee for a better life. He went into the aerospace industry, which was a booming business.  He became so skilled at making aircraft engine bolts that eventually he formed his own company.

At an early age he instilled the work ethic in me. He started me working on lathes and drill presses when I was nine years old. When I became a teenager I did his bookkeeping and payroll. Back then there were no computers and everything was done manually by hand. Once I got my driver’s license I became his truck driver. I learned to read maps and travel anywhere. Eventually I started working in his office as a sales representative. Eventually I became an outside sales representative and traveled all over the United States to military bases and sold our specialty large engine bolts. My father was not an easy person to work for because he did not teach me want to do instead he would say, “You figure it out.” He did this so that I would learn to think for myself. I think that was brilliant training. Eventually there came a point where I did not feel a calling to sell bolts and wanted to go back to college. My father was supportive even though he was disappointed that this was not what I wanted to do. He always was there for me no matter what my choices were.

Throughout my life in good times and bad I always went to my father for advice. His wisdom was remarkable and he was not judgmental and no matter what a stupid thing I might have done. His love for me was truly unconditional.

My father was always an Optimist.  No matter how rough things got he always felt that things would come out better. He developed Parkinson’s disease in his early sixties and he had a great deal of trouble talking, walking, and driving. He never let it stop him and he always said that he would make it even if he had to crawl. That strength and determination he passed on to me and I think of him always through my own struggles and hear those words, “I will make it even if I have to crawl.”

When I had my accident and injured my hips I was not able to do what I used to and my father did his best to help me in every way. Eventually I became crippled and bedridden. He never stopped being there for me and helping me as best he could. It was hard for him to accept what had happened to me at such a young age, but he always let me know he would be there for me and he was.

My father lapsed into a coma on Thanksgiving weekend in 1994.  I knew that he had a great fear of dying. The doctors were keeping him alive on machines and I just could not deal with that and had no legal authority to take him off life support.  I loved my father far too much to see him be a vegetable.

So I took matters into spiritual hands and put myself in a hypnotic state and I projected myself to his hospital room and there I took his spirit and we traveled to the other side (the fifth dimension). I figured my mother would be the first one to greet him as she passed away several years before. Surprisingly the person that greeted my father on the other side was his army sergeant who had been killed in World War Two. My father was so happy to see him again. I waited at the entrance and my father went inside and visited so many people that he loved and loved him. I could hear him laughing and talking.  When he was finished he came to me and we transported back into his hospital room and he went back into his body.  The next day he died. I knew that he died without fear.

The following morning as I awoke my father was screaming into my right ear everything he wanted me to know. I woke up saying, “Dad, you’re hurting my ear. Stop talking so loud.” I then did my best to remember exactly what he had been saying. It amazed me. I had never had such a spiritual connection in my life. Over the next few days he appeared to me, each time with a message. Throughout the years he has continued to communicate and on rare occasions I have been able to see him. It’s absolutely fascinating. He’s definitely my main Spirit Guide.

It’s difficult to express in words all that my father meant to me. These last twenty one years without him have been incredibly difficult, because he was the only person that really loved me and he was my security. For twenty one years I’ve been without that. It is a lonely feeling.

Yes, I do have spiritual contact with him from time to time. It always happens when I least expect it.

The thing that is the hardest is not having him here to talk to and hear his advice when I need it. I know that he cares and that eventually we will meet again face to face. Until then all I can say is, “I miss you Daddy.”

Your daughter,
Billie

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Comments on: "Twenty One Years Ago Today My Father Passed" (12)

  1. Sharon Verrechia said:

    What a wonderful Father you had, and I can understand why you miss him so very much. He was the one that you turned to for advice, and he never let you down. How amazing, you are able to go into spirit, and help him pass, without any fear. Thank you for sharing this with all of us. Many blessings to you, my dear friend.

    • Thank you for your kind words. My father was an amazing man when he was alive and even after. I know that he’s always with me, but it would be nice to talk face to face. Many blessings, Cherokee Billie ❤

  2. Much love & Respect. Warm hugs

  3. Linda DuMont said:

    what a special connection you and your father had and have. He must be incredibly proud of you, even today, as you live by his truth and wisdom and determination. i don’t have that connection to my father, but to my Grandmother, who is my most important angel guide, especially at this time in my life. hopefully we all have someone. I guess faith, that we will be together again someday, is a powerful blessing. Have a special day in memory of him, Billie. God bless you.

    • As always I appreciate your comment. I’m glad that you had your grandmother as we all need someone who we grew up with that we could turn to. I remember my father every day. Many blessings, Cherokee Billie ❤

  4. Beautiful tribute your father is still protecting you loving you Billie
    Love to you

  5. A beautiful tribute to your Dad. Thank you for sharing this. You taught me to talk to my loved ones when I felt the need. And it does help. Thank you for teaching me.
    Peace, Love and Harmony ~T

    • Thank you so much for your comment. It’s good to know that I was able to help you at a time that you really needed it. There is nothing more comforting them to feel the presence of a departed loved one. I do my very best. Many blessings, Cherokee Billie ❤

  6. You had an amazing father, and he had an equally amazing daughter!

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