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The Beaver Full Moon November 17, 2013
The Beaver Moon peaks overnight Sunday, Nov. 17. Its part of a trio of night-sky wonders this weekend, along with the Leonid meteor shower and prime viewing of Comet ISON.

November’s full Moon was called the Beaver Moon because it was the time to set traps, before the waters froze over. This Moon was also called the Full Frost Moon.

According to Native American folklore, the Beaver Moon gets its name for one of a few different reasons, both having to do with the dam-building, nocturnal rodents with the oar-shaped tails. The Old Farmer’s Almanac postulates that it is called the Beaver Moon because this month was just the right moment to set beaver traps before the winter freeze. But according to National Geographic, it could also be attributed to the “heavy activity of beavers building their winter dams.”

The full moon of is the smallest full moon of the year and will be darkened by the very subtle penumbral shadow of Earth during the night tonight or before dawn for North America. Cloudy where you are? Just can’t get up that early? Don’t worry. You can still see the moon boldly lighting up the night sky from dusk until dawn for the next couple of nights!

The Full Moon is a time of culmination and the promise of fulfillment of that which was started at the New Moon. It is an emotional time–a time of romance, fertilization, and relationships. With the Moon full and bright in the sky, symbolic “illumination” occurs in our own lives. However, these feelings and revelations are emotional ones, as there is a sense of emotions bursting forth into our consciousness. It’s time to express ourselves, and to let things out of our systems. Of course, we might want to exercise some care while doing so, knowing that what is coming out of us is not particularly rational as yet.

The full moon is bright — though magnitudes dimmer than the sun, according to Space.com — so it may overshadow the Leonid meteor shower, also peaking Sunday. “A full moon will shine all night long, making 2013 an unfavorable year for watching this meteor shower,” NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab reports.

Even still, if you’re a die-hard stargazer and you try to watch for the meteors, which radiate from the constellation Leo, expect about 15 meteors per hour, according to NASA. They’ll be traveling at around 44 miles per second. “As a rule of thumb,” adds EarthSky, “the Leonids intensify after midnight, and the greatest numbers fall just before dawn.” The site recommends waking up a few hours early for best viewing.

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Comments on: "The Beaver Full Moon November 17, 2013" (2)

  1. Thanks Cherokee, its always so interesting to read about Native American folklore. Love it!

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